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15 October 2020, 1:54 pm
Pearly Ti, J., Yeo, L., Anil, G.
SUMMARY:

We encountered 2 separate instances of damage to JET 7 reperfusion catheters when they were used in conjunction with a stent retriever during mechanical thrombectomy. On both occasions, after 1 or 2 passes with a stent retriever, we found that the distal end of the catheter was frayed and it ballooned up on flushing with saline. This mechanical failure could potentially lead to serious complications; hence, it should be shared with fellow neurointerventionalists.


8 October 2020, 6:45 pm
Goyal, M., Kromm, J., Ganesh, A., Wira, C., Southerland, A., Sheth, K. N., Khosravani, H., Panagos, P., McNair, N., Ospel, J. M., On behalf of the AHA/ASA Stroke Council Science Subcommittees: Emergency Neurovascular Care (ENCC), the Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Council, the Telestroke and the Neurovascular Intervention Committees
SUMMARY:

A health care crisis such as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic requires allocation of hospital staff and resources on short notice. Thus, new and sometimes less experienced team members might join the team to fill in the gaps. This scenario can be particularly challenging in endovascular stroke treatment, which is a highly specialized task that requires seamless cooperation of numerous health care workers across various specialties and professions. This document is intended for stroke teams who face the challenge of integrating new team members into endovascular stroke-treatment workflows during the COVID-19 pandemic or any other global health care emergency. It discusses the key strategies for smooth integration of new stroke-team members in a crisis situation: 1) transfer of key knowledge (simple take-home messages), 2) open communication and a nonjudgmental atmosphere, 3) strategic task assignment, and 4) graded learning and responsibility. While these 4 key principles should generally be followed in endovascular stroke treatment, they become even more important during health care emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic, when health care professionals have to take on new and additional roles and responsibilities in challenging working environments for which they were not specifically trained.


8 October 2020, 5:46 pm
Sharma, A., Walk, R. E., Tang, S. Y., Eldaya, R., Owen, P. J., Belavy, D. L.
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

When one uses T2 relaxometry to classify lumbar intervertebral discs as degenerated, it is unclear whether the normative data should be based on other intervertebral discs from the same individual or from a pool of extraneous controls. This study aimed to explore the extent of intra- versus intersubject variation in the T2 times of healthy intervertebral discs.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Using prospectively acquired T2-relaxometry data from 606 intervertebral discs in 101 volunteers without back pain (47 men, 54 women) in a narrow age range (25–35 years), we calculated intra- and intersubject variation in T2 times of intervertebral discs graded by 2 neuroradiologists on the Pfirrmann scale. Intrasubject variation of intervertebral discs was assessed relative to other healthy intervertebral discs (Pfirrmann grade, ≤2) in the same individual. Multiple intersubject variability measures were calculated using healthy extraneous references ranging from a single randomly selected intervertebral disc to all healthy extraneous intervertebral discs, without and with segmental stratification. These variability measures were compared for healthy and degenerated (Pfirrmann grade ≥3) intervertebral discs.

RESULTS:

The mean T2 values of healthy (493/606, 81.3%) and degenerated intervertebral discs were 121.1 ± 22.5 ms and 91.5 ± 18.6 ms, respectively (P < .001). The mean intrasubject variability for healthy intervertebral discs was 9.8 ± 10.7 ms, lower than all intersubject variability measures (P < .001), and provided the most pronounced separation for healthy and degenerated intervertebral discs. Among intersubject variability measures, using all segment-matched healthy discs as references provided the lowest variability (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Normative measures based on the T2 times of healthy intervertebral discs from the same individual are likely to provide the most discriminating means of identifying degenerated intervertebral discs on the basis of T2 relaxometry.


8 October 2020, 5:44 pm
Asnafi, S., Duszak, R., Hemingway, J. M., Hughes, D. R., Allen, J. W.
SUMMARY:

Using the Medicare Physician-Supplier Procedure Summary Master File, we evaluated the evolving use of fMRI in Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries from 2007 through 2017. Annual use rates (per 1,000,000 enrollees) increased from 17.7 to 32.8 through 2014 and have remained static since. Radiologists have remained the dominant specialty group from 2007 to 2017 (86.4% and 88.6% of all services, respectively), and the outpatient setting has remained the dominant place of service (65.4% and 65.4%, respectively).


8 October 2020, 5:00 pm
Cervo, A., Ferrari, F., Barchetti, G., Quilici, L., Piano, M., Boccardi, E., Pero, G.
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

In cases of large-vessel-occlusion strokes due to an underlying tandem internal carotid artery occlusion or intracranial atherosclerotic disease, concomitant stent placement may be needed. Immediate platelet inhibition is necessary, but to date, a standardized approach for antiplatelet inhibition in acute settings is still missing. Here we report our single-center experience about the safety and efficacy of periprocedural administration of cangrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to intracranial or cervical artery occlusion undergoing stent placement.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We retrospectively evaluated all cases of acute ischemic stroke that needed acute stent implantation and were treated with periprocedural administration of cangrelor between January 2019 and April 2020 at our institution. All patients who needed either extracranial or intracranial artery stent placement (in either the anterior or posterior circulation) were included.

RESULTS:

We evaluated 38 patients in whom cangrelor was administered IV periprocedurally. Their mean age was 64 years (range, 26–85 years), with 25/38 male subjects and 13/38 female patients. In 26 patients (68.4%), a tandem occlusion was present and was treated with carotid artery stent placement, while 12 patients (31.6%) required an intracranial stent implantation. In 4 subjects (10.5%), an intracerebral hemorrhage occurred after the procedure. All patients in the series were alive 1 week after the procedure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although larger, multicentric randomized studies are strongly warranted, our results support the hypothesis of a possible role of cangrelor as a valuable therapeutic option in the management of platelet inhibition in acute ischemic stroke procedures after intra- or extracranial stent placement.


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