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22 February 2017, 6:30 pm
Editorial Office

LINNC NYC

Don’t miss this course in neuroradiology and neurosurgery!

Mark your calendars for March 24-25, 2017.

Program topics include:

  • Stenting
  • Flow diverters
  • Y-stenting for aneurysm treatment
  • Stroke treatment

The seminar is accredited for 14.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ by the ACCME through the joint providership of the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and is compliant with the Eucomed Code of Ethical Business Practice.

Our meeting’s philosophy is based on you!

Led by Jacques Moret and faculty, we are gearing up for the seminar with recorded cases focusing on a wide variety of themes and techniques linked to our specialty. Our program is being adapted in real time to fit your needs and provide you with tips and tricks that are directly applicable to your daily practice.

Access the program

Grants for young doctors:

The LINNC Seminar and its scientific committee promote talent and educate tomorrow’s best physicians through an exceptional grant. Registration fees, accommodation, and transportation are included.

View application terms

Join us and discover the LINNC Seminar experience!

http://www.youtube.com/embed/ZreXFgae1AI

The post LINNC NYC 2017 Seminar appeared first on AJNR Blog.


20 February 2017, 9:10 pm
Editorial Office

Clipboard01

May 3-5, 2017

24 CME and 3 SAM credits

Course Director: Andrei I. Holodny, MD

Conference Location:

Weill Greenberg Center
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
1305 York Avenue (at 70th Street)
New York, NY 10065

Course Overview:

During most MRI procedures, there is no need for interaction between the administrator of the test and the patient. The situation is quite the opposite in functional MRI (fMRI), where the neurological status of the patient must be assessed; an appropriate paradigm must be selected based on the neurological assessment and prior MRI examinations. Further, the paradigm must be delivered to and successfully performed by the patient while in the MRI machine. In addition, there is a rather complicated analysis of the fMRI and diffusion tractography data, which must be performed and assessed. How to properly perform these tasks is often not addressed during residency and fellowship training or in annual scientific society meetings.

Target Audience:

Clinicians involved in fMRI, including neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons and neurologists.

Educational Objectives:

  • Understand the fundamental principles behind fMRI and diffusion tractography
  • Choose the optimal fMRI paradigms appropriate for the patient and clinical situation
  • Deliver fMRI paradigms correctly and monitor the patient for adequate compliance
  • Hands on experience so that the attendee will be able to analyze fMRI and diffusion tractography
  • Understand how data is delivered to a neurosurgical navigational system and used by the neurosurgeon
  • Avoid pitfalls in the interpretation of clinical fMRI and diffusion tractography
  • Optimize fMRI billing and coding

Accreditation Statement:

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the International Institute for Continuing Medical Education, Inc. and fMRI Consultants LLC. The International Institute for Continuing Medical Education Inc. is accredited by the ACCME …

The post Opportunity to Attend a Hands-On Clinical fMRI and Diffusion Tractography Course appeared first on AJNR Blog.


19 February 2017, 6:30 pm
jross

Fellows’ Journal Club

In this retrospective study, synthetic T2-weighted, FLAIR, double inversion recovery, and phase-sensitive inversion recovery images were produced in 12 patients with MS after quantification of T1 and T2 values and proton density. Double inversion recovery images were optimized for each patient by adjusting the TI. The number of visible plaques was determined by a radiologist for a set of these 4 types of synthetic MR images and a set of conventional T1-weighted inversion recovery, T2-weighted, and FLAIR images. Conventional 3D double inversion recovery and other available images were used as the criterion standard. Synthetic MR imaging enabled detection of more MS plaques than conventional MR imaging in a comparable acquisition time (approximately 7 minutes). The contrast for MS plaques on synthetic double inversion recovery images was better than on conventional double inversion recovery images.

Abstract

Figure 1 from paper
An example of DIR optimization. A DIR image with a second TI of 460 ms (A) (as determined according to the equations in the main text) shows better delineation of MS plaques than a DIR image with a second TI of 360 ms (B) or 560 ms (C).

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Synthetic MR imaging enables the creation of various contrast-weighted images including double inversion recovery and phase-sensitive inversion recovery from a single MR imaging quantification scan. Here, we assessed whether synthetic MR imaging is suitable for detecting MS plaques.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Quantitative and conventional MR imaging data on 12 patients with MS were retrospectively analyzed. Synthetic T2-weighted, FLAIR, double inversion recovery, and phase-sensitive inversion recovery images were produced after quantification of T1 and T2 values and proton density. Double inversion recovery images were optimized for each patient by adjusting the TI. The number of visible plaques was determined by a radiologist for a set of these 4 types of synthetic MR

The post Synthetic MRI in the Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques appeared first on AJNR Blog.


18 February 2017, 6:30 pm
jross

Editor’s Choice

The purpose of this study was to use DCE MR imaging to quantify the contrast permeability of intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques in 10 symptomatic patients and to compare these parameters against existing markers of plaque volatility using black-blood MR imaging pulse sequences. Ktrans and fractional plasma volume (Vp) measurements were higher in plaques versus healthy white matter and similar or less than values in the choroid plexus. Only Ktrans correlated significantly with time from symptom onset. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging parameters were not found to correlate significantly with intraplaque enhancement or hyperintensity. The authors suggest that Ktrans may be an independent imaging biomarker of acute and symptom-associated pathologic changes in intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques.

Abstract

Figure 4 from paper
Ktrans plaque permeability differs from relative signal enhancement in T1 SPACE imaging in 2 patients. Each panel shows axial TOF MRA (upper left), axial T1 SPACE (upper right), and sagittal T1 SPACE (middle) MR images confirming vessel patency with eccentric plaque, and Ktrans (lower). A, A 69-year-old man with right posterior cerebral artery stenosis on TOF MRA and corresponding T1 SPACE plaque enhancement measured at 123%. Ktrans measured at 0.39 minutes−1, and Vp at 11%. B, A 54-year-old woman with right MCA stenosis and corresponding T1 SPACE plaque enhancement measured at 226%, Ktransmeasured at 0.45 minutes−1, and Vp at 12%.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaque hyperintensity and/or gadolinium contrast enhancement have been studied as imaging biomarkers of acutely symptomatic ischemic presentations using single static MR imaging measurements. However, the value in modeling the dynamics of intracranial plaque permeability has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to use dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging to quantify the contrast permeability of intracranial atherosclerotic

The post Quantifying Intracranial Plaque Permeability with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study appeared first on AJNR Blog.


17 February 2017, 8:30 pm
bookreviews

Brandão LA, ed. Mukherji SK, consulting ed. Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Adult Brain Tumors. Elsevier; 2016;26(4):493–694; $360.00

Brandao cover

This November 2016 issue of the Neuroimaging Clinics of North America consists of 9 chapters (nearly 200 pages in length) and covers a number of aspects of adult brain tumors. Edited by Dr. Lara Brandão with contributions from 21 international and national authors, this volume deals with (in order): posterior fossa tumors, lymphomas (2 chapters), the pre- and posttreatment evaluation of gliomas (2 chapters), metastasis, extra parenchymal tumors, advanced MR techniques, and interesting cases of pseudotumors. It is a bit surprising that there is not a chapter dedicated to the emerging brain tumor classifications based on molecular/genetic factors. While in our daily readings of brain MRs and CTs, we do not consider these molecular factors, these issues are discussed among members of neuro-oncology tumor boards, on which neuroradiologists are participants. With the increased emphasis on ICD types and their implications for therapy, some space on this subject is warranted. Had this been included, some of the terminology used elsewhere in the book might have been altered. Of course, the chapter on posttreatment of gliomas and the complexities in the analysis of such patients will be of great interest to the readers of this volume. The extensive material on lymphomas is important and noteworthy because of the increased incidence of disease and the multiple parameters that can be utilized in its detection and evaluation. Many important teaching points are raised in this 54-page (2-chapter) evaluation of lymphomas.

The images included in this volume are of high quality and are well-described, with important structural changes in brain tumors included. Even if one does not read the volume cover-to-cover, one can derive an understanding (providing a good review) of adult brain tumors and see …

The post Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Adult Brain Tumors appeared first on AJNR Blog.


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